Tag Archives: laramie

LCCC Board approves LOI for student housing over The Hole and The Hynds

Architect Glen Garrett discusses the basic lot configuration of The Hole and The Hynds Building at the October 3rd LCCC Board of Trustees study session. The Hynds Capitol Core Project constructs a mixed use development including 65 apartments in new construction over The Hole and the renovated Hynds Building. Click on the image to view the full architectural presentation.

The Laramie County Community College Board of Trustees met on Wednesday October 117th. On the regular meeting agenda was formal consideration of its intentions to occupy about 65 apartments in Downtown Cheyenne.

The Board unanimously agreed to move foward with a student housing preference survey and determine an appropriate management approach. Download a copy of the Letter of Intent by clicking on the LOI link.

New construction is planned to cover the long-vacant “Hole” and The Hynds Building renovated for the mixed use project that also includes commercial and civic space.

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WFO – WCM to host filmmaker tour around SE Wyoming

Territorial Prison

The Wyoming Film Office and Wyoming Community Media are hosting a tour for out of Wyoming filmmakers of Southeast Wyoming prior to the Cheyenne International Film Festival May 17 - 20. Space is limited!

Wyoming Film Office and Wyoming Community Media are hosting a tour for out-of-Wyoming filmmakers of movie locations around southeast Wyoming in conjunction with the Cheyenne International Film Festival (CIFF).

The CIFF begins May 17 in Downtown Cheyenne with the local filmmaker and festival reception at the Depot Museum before the festival opens Friday evening May 18 and extends through Sunday May 20.

Thursday, May 17

  • 9:30      Depart Cheyenne (Cheyenne to Fort Laramie: 1 hour 44 minutes)
  • 11:30     Fort Laramie (Fort Laramie to Sunrise: 20 minutes)\
  • 12:10     Depart
  • 12:30     Hartville Lunch
  • 1:30       Depart Hartville
  • 1:40       Sunrise, Wyoming
  • 2:15       Depart Sunrise
  • 2:15       Molton Pass towards Laramie (Hartville to Laramie 2 hrs)
  • 4:30       Arrive at Territorial Park in Laramie
  • 5:30       Depart
  • 5:45       Check into Hotel
  • 6:30       Dinner and overnight in Laramie

Friday, May 18

  • 8:00       Breakfast
  • 9:00       Tour Laramie locations (see below for ideas)
  • 11:00      Depart for Vedauwoo
  • 12:30      Lunch at The Plains
  • 1:30        Trolley Tour (various historic locations, see below)
  • 4:00        Super Computer (or Terry Bison Ranch)
  • 6:00        CIFF Opening Night Reception – Atlas Theatre

For more information – contact Colin Stricklin at the Wyoming Film Office 307-777-3400; email Alan O’Hashi or call 307-509-0182

WCM seeks content about Occupy movement in Wyoming for documentary

WCM is curious about Occupy Wyoming and wants to document it. WCM seeks digital video, images, music, audio. Click on the flag to go check out the Occupy Wyoming resource nexus.

Imagine when the Occupy Wall Street movement gets untracked? It’s just a matter of time when the tipping point happens. Occupy Wall Street in Wyoming is evidence that the tipping point is near. This site won’t be updated much, but will serve as a resource about Wyoming-based OWS efforts to the outside world. Dynamic info will be a result of locally-maintained facebook pages, groups and local websites.

Why is Wyoming important? The movement in Wyoming is unique and demonstrates the ubiquity of its appeal when considering the Equality State is the least populated – 565,000 people. It has only two cities over 50,000 – Casper and Cheyenne and dominated by the Republican Party – State legislature 76 GOP; 14 DEM.

Wyoming Community Media (WCM) is putting this information together with an eye on documenting the Occupy Wall Street movement in Wyoming. Wyoming should be an Occupy movement bell weather state. If the movement gains traction in a conservative stronghold, it will be clear the message is cross cutting.

This is one of many unofficial online resources for the growing occupation movement happening around Wyoming and the world. Here’s what the official unofficial Occupy Wall Street website has to say:

“Occupy Wall Street is a people-powered movement that began on September 17, 2011 in Liberty Square in Manhattan’s Financial District, and has spread to over 100 cities in the United States and actions in over 1,500 cities globally. OWS is fighting back against the corrosive power of major banks and multinational corporations over the democratic process, and the role of Wall Street in creating an economic collapse that has caused the greatest recession in generations . . .The occupations around the world are being organized using a non-binding consensus based collective decision making tool known as a “people’s assembly”.

If you have links to video, photo albums, music, etc. contact WCM by email.

First ‘Lights, Camera, Action! workshop attracts 6 participants

WCM - LCCC Lights Camera Action! workshop

Click on the image of the WCM - LCCC Lights, Camera, Action! workshop to watch Kyle Markley's story.

KGWN TV reporter Kyle Marley was on hand for the WCM – Laramie County Community College Lights, Camera, Action! video production and storytelling workshop recently.

By: Kyle Markley
KGWN News Channel 5
Using video to tell a story can be done in a variety of ways. It can be used to make a commercial, a movie, or possibly a TV show.

Alan O’Hashi started doing community based media training back in 2004, and loves sharing his passion with others. “I live vicariously through other people,” said O’Hashi. “There are folks I know who have been doing this business for quite a number of years, and have shot on film and worked in the business for a long time.”

Saturday’s class was the first of it’s kind that has been taught in Cheyenne. “It was really kind of fun to work with people I would consider non-traditional students. I’ve taught this class before in Laramie and just got back from doing it up in Casper.”

Joseph Goodrich was one of O’Hashi’s students and was looking to make himself more marketable as a professional through this class. “I’m a very experienced photographer,” said Goodrich. “I’m looking to expand my skills and put some more tools in the toolbox and a natural ascension would be to go to video.”

Goodrich learned the right way to tell a story with his work. “I really enjoyed the script writing analysis of it. I found that telling the story from beginning, middle, and end, and thinking the story all the way through is an excellent way to prepare yourself before you get behind the camera.”

Goodrich aspires to shoot a reality TV show, and he found the class to be just what he needed to take that first step. “I think this is an excellent first step. Especially if you have no camera experience because not only do you cover the editing process I described earlier, but we cover lights.”

O’Hashi said he hopes his students have the tools they need to use video to their advantage.”They can pick up a professional camera and do the same type of story telling. Really helping people engage, talk about their differences, talk about what they have in common really in sort of the safe space of video.”

To sign up for classes coming in June, you can visit the Wyoming Community Media Website at wycomedia.com

WCM developing technical certificate in video production

Wyoming leads the nation in post high school technical certificates earned by Wyoming residents and Wyoming Community Media (WCM) will be adding to this trend.

WCM in collaboration with Laramie County Community College (LCCC) is developing a community-based experience which combines teaching with hands-on experience to produce informational videos, podcasts, photo essays and other transmedia versions for nonprofit organizations.

According to an article that appears in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, a report released by Complete College America Wyoming had the highest proportionate number of residents  earning long-term technical certificate that boost careers and result in higher wages. CCA is a non-profit organization based in Washington D.C.

Post high school certificates are issued after short term or long term and coursework generally takes less than a year to a year or more to complete. While the report finds that the greatest benefit came from completing a long-term certificate, the WCM – LCCC video production certificate will likely start out as a short term program.

Additionally, growth in community colleges is projected to happen quickly through the new “Skills For America’s Future” federal program that develops stronger partnerships between private sector and community colleges with an additional 5 million associate degrees awarded by 2020.

WCM plans to create “production teams” of six to 10 individuals who will learn as they experience preproduction – working with a client, writing, location scouting; production – lighting a scene, setting sound, operating a camera; postproduction – editing and distribution.

Who can participate? Primarily, the course will be set up for residents who may be displaced from the labor force – either unemployed or underemployed – and current members of the labor force who want to learn new skills or augment existing skills with digital media arts knowledge and experience.

The work won’t consist of tedious projects, rather, projects that will be used by local non-profit organizations to tell their stories. For more information respond by commenting on the post.

The New West Creative Economy – Just talk or can it be real?

Wyoming Community Media (WCM) is embarking on a great little adventure by taking a stab at developing the New West Creative Economy in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Traditional “economic development” basically brings together elements of commerce and industry to come up ways of increasing the economic base with primary “value added” type jobs – making stuff; as opposed to the “service sector” which don’t really add value, but maintain value. Traditionally, arts and education are viewed as “add-ons” and reasons why a new employee would want to relocate to a given community.

The New West Creative Economy wrote a “white paper” in 2009 outlining how this all might be rolled out. There was a community gathering which resulted in author Daniel Pink eventually coming to Cheyenne in 2010. Download a copy of their paper by clicking on the logo.

The New West Creative Economy takes a little different approach and asks, what if arts and culture were integral parts of economic and community development in terms of developing a labor force that uses their entire brains, not just the left or right side?

With nothing much than an academic idea and some equity from the Wyoming Arts Council, WCM hopes that the initial strategic partnerships with Laramie County Community College, The Wyoming Film Office, The City of Cheyenne, Wyoming Lifestyle Magazine, Visit Cheyenne and LightsOn Downtown Group will be enough impetus to grow the collaboration in response to the New West Creative Economy’s basic premise.

The New Creative Economic paradigm shift, by Howard Major, and Maryellen Tast of Laramie County Community College

There are six goals:

  • Create community development in Southeast Wyoming by creating synergistic actions by individuals and groups promoting cultural development, economic development and educational development.
  • Facilitate a dialog about how all concerned residents can contribute to the growth and diversification of the South eastern Wyoming economy through continuing economic development and synergistic infusion of the cultural arts and PK-20 education.
  • Capture the wisdom of community developers who have merged cultural arts and economic and educational development in other regions of the country and apply those development concepts that are a good “fit” for Southeastern Wyoming.
  • Create and complete innovative projects that expand and develop Wyoming’s cultural and economic environments.
  • Develop new regional organizations and partnerships that promote the advancement of culture, education and high-tech industries.
  • Contribute to the role of cultural and educational organizations in community and economic development.

Daniel Pink, author of “A Whole New Mind,” appeared in Cheyenne to discuss the meaning and possibilities of an economy in which creative thinking becomes more dominant.

The key to getting the new west creative economy off to a good start is acceptance by the private sector. There are plenty of academics talking about this, lots of non-profits trying to hang their hats on it, and a few businesses accepting it. But the bottom line is this. The only reason this will become acceptable is if it results in not just job creation, but additional profits.

The New West Creative Economy is basically a think tank established by Laramie County Community College.

LCCC is taking this seriously, having brought in Daniel Pink to get everyone jazzed up about how right brained people will save the economy. The Wyoming Arts Council held an apres Pink talk back the next morning, which is ultimately what spurred on the WCM project.

The WCM project is a pilot project to use the “transmedia” story telling model by cross-utilizing traditional print media, photographers, videographers and web designers to help the private non-profit and for profit sectors become more relevant in the digital age.

Are we talking about a new type of “activist”?

WCM awarded big Arts Council grant

Wyoming Community Media (WCM), in partnership with Laramie County Community College (LCCC), the City of Cheyenne (CITY), LightsOn! Development Group (LightsOn!) and the Cheyenne Convention and Visitors’ Bureau (Visit Cheyenne), Wyoming Film Office (WFO), Wyoming Lifestyle Magazine TV (WLMTV)will provide a variety of opportunities to attract digital media artists – webmasters, photographers, filmmakers, animators – to Cheyenne and grow homegrown digi-artists to diversity the vitality of Downtown Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Growth in community colleges is projected to happen quickly through the new “Skills For America’s Future” program that develops stronger partnerships between private sector and community colleges with an additional 5 million associate degrees awarded by 2020. The WCM CAP project is on the leading edge of this trend.

WCM video and digital media courses will be taught on collaboration with LCCC in Downtown Cheyenne.

Cheyenne has a rich arts community and is an emerging digital media-based community. Cheyenne is the home of the UCAR super computer that is being developed in partnership with the University of Colorado — Boulder and the University of Wyoming. The Cheyenne economic base is ripe for expansion in the areas of digital media arts.

WCM and its partners want individuals and groups in the Cheyenne community and attract others to develop a space to tell their stories, share their commonalities and differences in the safe haven of the arts and particularly digital media.

Visit Cheyenne, the LightsOn!, the WFO the City and LCCC all promote the arts and culture as ways to expand and vitalize Downtown Cheyenne. In addition to merely promoting the arts as an “add-on” to community development, the project’s goal is to integrate digital arts into the Downtown fabric. WCM proposes to create additional partnerships with at least seven Downtown cultural activities, organizations and events for which promotional videos will be produced to increase cultural tourism in Downtown Cheyenne.

The Wind River Tribal College Shoot Out Cheyenne team poses in front of the Lincoln Theater

As a baseline, Cheyenne lodging tax figures declined 10.5 percent and sales and use tax collections are down 12.7 percent between the 1st quarters of 2009 to 2010. The Wyoming Arts Council (WAC) developed a Cultural Vitality Index (CVI) measuring arts and culture activity. The Wyoming CVI was recently released and doesn’t analyze digital media arts.

However, based on analysis of eight job categories identified by the CVI, Southeast Wyoming has experienced a 9 percent decrease in digital arts job count and broken down further, Laramie County had a 27 percent decline between 2006 and 2008 from 104 jobs to 82 digital arts jobs.

WCM is working with LCCC to develop a digital media filmmaking curriculum – to augment its existing web design and photography courses – that takes place in Downtown Cheyenne. Not only will participants learn hands-on skills related to pre-production tasks including story telling/screenwriting, casting, location scouting; production services — lighting, sound and camera operation; post production — editing, but also skills around distribution such as through film festival production, on websites and community access television.

Oscar-nominated filmmaker Dan Junge and his wife Erin visit with Joe Evans at the CIFF.

This project will assist WCM and LCCC design an academic curriculum for those wishing to learn more about digital video media arts and how it can be applied to existing jobs, nurture entrepreneurship of those reinventing themselves, create means and ways for communities to tell their stories and apply their learning in “out of school” experience in partnership with local non-profit organizations. WCM plans to partner with at least five downtown projects and produce promos for the events to bring more cultural tourists to downtown Cheyenne.

WLMTV reporter Kati Hime interviews a vendor at the Cheyenne Frontier Days parade for a "Wyoming Greats" episode.

The project also provides a way to integrate art into the community through monthly Downtown Brown Bag series at non-traditional venues – bookstores, banks, law firms, architect offices, etc. – for local business owners and organizations to position themselves as potential purveyors of goods and services or as locations to the film and digital media industry or for artists wanting to learn about entrepreneurship and the business of art.