Tag Archives: transmedia

Lights, Camera, Action! seminar Aug. 27th in Saratoga at W2F

Lights, Camera, Action! at the Wyoming Film Festival

Click on the logo to enter the CCHEC page.

Create professional videos without being a professional! Sign up for the Wyoming Community Media (WCM) Lights, Camera, Action! seminar August 27th through the Carbon County Higher Education Center (CCHEC).

WCM and CCHEC are teaming up to provide the video production seminar during the Wyoming Film Festival in Saratoga.

Participants will produce a short film during the class which will be screened at the Wyoming Film Festival on Saturday night August 27th. Also, there will be hands-on practical filming opportunities. The W2F is also has a need for panelists, speakers and filmmakers to be filmed for a documentary.

Learn how to operate a video camera, the basics of setting up lights and sound and the fundamentals of screenwriting while working on an actual film production project. Check us out on facebook!

Lights, Camera, Action! instructor Alan O'Hashi

Click on Alan O'Hashi's image to check out the WCM facebook page

The seminar instructor is WCM Executive Director and Producer Alan O’Hashi. He has been providing video – TV and Movie production services and training since 2004 and also produces the Cheyenne International Film Festival and The Shoot Out Cheyenne 24 hour film making festival.

Upcoming workshop dates:

Cost: $50 Location: Platte Valley Community Center – Saratoga, Wyoming
Registration Information: (307) 328-9204

Thank you to the Wyoming Arts Council, Wyoming Lifestyle Magazine, Wyoming Film Office, and the Carbon County Higher Education Center for their support.

These workshops are being offered for enrichment. No college credit will be issued. CCHEC reserves the right to cancel any classes without sufficient registration.

First ‘Lights, Camera, Action! workshop attracts 6 participants

WCM - LCCC Lights Camera Action! workshop

Click on the image of the WCM - LCCC Lights, Camera, Action! workshop to watch Kyle Markley's story.

KGWN TV reporter Kyle Marley was on hand for the WCM – Laramie County Community College Lights, Camera, Action! video production and storytelling workshop recently.

By: Kyle Markley
KGWN News Channel 5
Using video to tell a story can be done in a variety of ways. It can be used to make a commercial, a movie, or possibly a TV show.

Alan O’Hashi started doing community based media training back in 2004, and loves sharing his passion with others. “I live vicariously through other people,” said O’Hashi. “There are folks I know who have been doing this business for quite a number of years, and have shot on film and worked in the business for a long time.”

Saturday’s class was the first of it’s kind that has been taught in Cheyenne. “It was really kind of fun to work with people I would consider non-traditional students. I’ve taught this class before in Laramie and just got back from doing it up in Casper.”

Joseph Goodrich was one of O’Hashi’s students and was looking to make himself more marketable as a professional through this class. “I’m a very experienced photographer,” said Goodrich. “I’m looking to expand my skills and put some more tools in the toolbox and a natural ascension would be to go to video.”

Goodrich learned the right way to tell a story with his work. “I really enjoyed the script writing analysis of it. I found that telling the story from beginning, middle, and end, and thinking the story all the way through is an excellent way to prepare yourself before you get behind the camera.”

Goodrich aspires to shoot a reality TV show, and he found the class to be just what he needed to take that first step. “I think this is an excellent first step. Especially if you have no camera experience because not only do you cover the editing process I described earlier, but we cover lights.”

O’Hashi said he hopes his students have the tools they need to use video to their advantage.”They can pick up a professional camera and do the same type of story telling. Really helping people engage, talk about their differences, talk about what they have in common really in sort of the safe space of video.”

To sign up for classes coming in June, you can visit the Wyoming Community Media Website at wycomedia.com

WCM and Wyoming Lifestyle Magazine tells transmedia stories

Find the latest edition of Wyoming Lifestyle Magazine (WLM) and see transmedia storytelling in action. On page 9 is the print version of the inauguration of Governor Matt Mead.

You’re then led to a link on WLM Telvision (WLMTV) to watch a video news package of the day’s activities that started at the Cheyenne Civic Center and ended with hundreds of well-wishers at the state capitol building.

WCM and WLM caught up with the Governor, Secretary of State Max Maxfield and Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill. Reporters also talked with inauguration activity attendees from around Wyoming. Watch the video by clicking on the Wyoming Lifestyle Magazine logo.

WCM seeks nonprofits with stories to tell

Wyoming Community Media (WCM) seeks Wyoming-based 501(c)(3) organizations who want to tell their stories in transmedia formats. What if you could tell your story to audiences in a variety of ways – video on TV; on the printed page; audio on the radio; photo essays.

It’s common knowledge these days that people obtain their information in a variety of ways. Some people are auditory learners, others rely on seeing the news and some are kinetic learners and want to get closer to what they are learning through experiences.

The more complex your organization’s mission the better. WCM will work with you to tell your stories better. Maybe you have some case studies you’d like to roll out, or basic information about your group, or want to get a fund raising message across.

If you’ve been keeping up with the WCM posts lately, you’ll know that the Wyoming Arts Council approved a grant to do just what is being asked. WCM in collaboration with Laramie County Community College is putting together a transmedia production class based in the community. Teams will work with nonprofits to get messages out there.

The grant funds allow WCM to defray its production costs and organizations are asked to also participate with a small production fee that will be plowed back into the project.

If interested, please respond by email to WCM Transmedia Project

WCM developing technical certificate in video production

Wyoming leads the nation in post high school technical certificates earned by Wyoming residents and Wyoming Community Media (WCM) will be adding to this trend.

WCM in collaboration with Laramie County Community College (LCCC) is developing a community-based experience which combines teaching with hands-on experience to produce informational videos, podcasts, photo essays and other transmedia versions for nonprofit organizations.

According to an article that appears in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, a report released by Complete College America Wyoming had the highest proportionate number of residents  earning long-term technical certificate that boost careers and result in higher wages. CCA is a non-profit organization based in Washington D.C.

Post high school certificates are issued after short term or long term and coursework generally takes less than a year to a year or more to complete. While the report finds that the greatest benefit came from completing a long-term certificate, the WCM – LCCC video production certificate will likely start out as a short term program.

Additionally, growth in community colleges is projected to happen quickly through the new “Skills For America’s Future” federal program that develops stronger partnerships between private sector and community colleges with an additional 5 million associate degrees awarded by 2020.

WCM plans to create “production teams” of six to 10 individuals who will learn as they experience preproduction – working with a client, writing, location scouting; production – lighting a scene, setting sound, operating a camera; postproduction – editing and distribution.

Who can participate? Primarily, the course will be set up for residents who may be displaced from the labor force – either unemployed or underemployed – and current members of the labor force who want to learn new skills or augment existing skills with digital media arts knowledge and experience.

The work won’t consist of tedious projects, rather, projects that will be used by local non-profit organizations to tell their stories. For more information respond by commenting on the post.

Contemporary storytelling – transmedia paradigm shift

Wyoming Community Media (WCM) is developing a project in the New Creative Economy. WCM has partnered up with Laramie County Community College (LCCC), Wyoming Lifestyle Magazine (WLM) Media in the Public Interest (MPI), the Public News Service – Wyoming (WPNS) and a variety of Cheyenne community and economic development organizations with the hopes of teaching students how to use digital media arts as a way for the private sector can better tell their stories.

Storytelling is an art that involves creative and critical thinking, not a bunch of rules of structure. Stories well told mold the structure.

Stories have been told for centuries to convey information create relationships with others and be more empathetic to others. Stories haven’t changed much, but the ways they are conveyed have multiplied over the years. This day and age information flies at the speed of light around the world via TV, YouTube, Radio, TV reporting about YouTube and print media catering to a variety of niches.

As a result of the info explosion, Institutional wisdom isn’t as important as it used to be. In the not-so-distant past, the wise sages who held information and experiences of community or a business in their heads were revered. These days, that’s not the case. The wisdom of crowds prevails – Google, Wikipedia and user groups are kings.

If a company wants to sell goods or services and want to get a consistent message out there, one way to do that is through “transmedia storytelling” (TMS).

That sounds a little academic and it is. TMS began as a scholarly term first coined by Henry Jenkins in his book Convergence Culture. He says, “transmedia represents the integration of entertainment experiences across a range of different media platforms,” Jenkins goes on to say that transmedia storytelling  “immerses an audience in a story’s universe through a number of dispersed entry points, providing a comprehensive and coordinated experience of a complex story.”

A strong transmedia strategy means stories remain connected by the same main narrative and theme. Each entry point presents the story natively, in a way it does most effectively, rather than re-purposing the story for multi platforms. What kind of stories are we talking about? Any long or short form genre – documentary, commercial, narrative, journalistic news, essays, blogs.

In the current case, Howard Major, and Maryellen Tast of LCCC wrote about a Creative Economy community development model in their white paper, Cheyenne at Stake: Comprehensive Community Development For the 21st Century (2009).

WCM is developing in partnership with LCCC an alpha-level curriculum that will bridge digital media and traditional media. People will be trained to work with and within local non-profit organizations, reporting cultural events and private for profit businesses develop stories to sell their goods and services that will be presented initially through these transmedia portals – Wyoming Lifestyle Magazine hard copy, Wyoming Lifestyle Magazine web TV, Community TV on Bresnan channel 22 and more traditional news and information distribution through Media in the Public Interest and the Public News Service – Wyoming.

Local residents learning new skills for existing jobs, reinvented skills for entrepreneurs and potentially new residents moving to Cheyenne to ply their digital media arts skills in new jobs represent economic and community development components of the project. Will this model replace journalism? Journalism is an overlay to storytelling. It isn’t designed to be a replacement, although KQED PBS in San Francisco is using TMS to tell science and nature stories in photos, TV and for education.

Over the couple months, this project’s story will come together.

WCM awarded big Arts Council grant

Wyoming Community Media (WCM), in partnership with Laramie County Community College (LCCC), the City of Cheyenne (CITY), LightsOn! Development Group (LightsOn!) and the Cheyenne Convention and Visitors’ Bureau (Visit Cheyenne), Wyoming Film Office (WFO), Wyoming Lifestyle Magazine TV (WLMTV)will provide a variety of opportunities to attract digital media artists – webmasters, photographers, filmmakers, animators – to Cheyenne and grow homegrown digi-artists to diversity the vitality of Downtown Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Growth in community colleges is projected to happen quickly through the new “Skills For America’s Future” program that develops stronger partnerships between private sector and community colleges with an additional 5 million associate degrees awarded by 2020. The WCM CAP project is on the leading edge of this trend.

WCM video and digital media courses will be taught on collaboration with LCCC in Downtown Cheyenne.

Cheyenne has a rich arts community and is an emerging digital media-based community. Cheyenne is the home of the UCAR super computer that is being developed in partnership with the University of Colorado — Boulder and the University of Wyoming. The Cheyenne economic base is ripe for expansion in the areas of digital media arts.

WCM and its partners want individuals and groups in the Cheyenne community and attract others to develop a space to tell their stories, share their commonalities and differences in the safe haven of the arts and particularly digital media.

Visit Cheyenne, the LightsOn!, the WFO the City and LCCC all promote the arts and culture as ways to expand and vitalize Downtown Cheyenne. In addition to merely promoting the arts as an “add-on” to community development, the project’s goal is to integrate digital arts into the Downtown fabric. WCM proposes to create additional partnerships with at least seven Downtown cultural activities, organizations and events for which promotional videos will be produced to increase cultural tourism in Downtown Cheyenne.

The Wind River Tribal College Shoot Out Cheyenne team poses in front of the Lincoln Theater

As a baseline, Cheyenne lodging tax figures declined 10.5 percent and sales and use tax collections are down 12.7 percent between the 1st quarters of 2009 to 2010. The Wyoming Arts Council (WAC) developed a Cultural Vitality Index (CVI) measuring arts and culture activity. The Wyoming CVI was recently released and doesn’t analyze digital media arts.

However, based on analysis of eight job categories identified by the CVI, Southeast Wyoming has experienced a 9 percent decrease in digital arts job count and broken down further, Laramie County had a 27 percent decline between 2006 and 2008 from 104 jobs to 82 digital arts jobs.

WCM is working with LCCC to develop a digital media filmmaking curriculum – to augment its existing web design and photography courses – that takes place in Downtown Cheyenne. Not only will participants learn hands-on skills related to pre-production tasks including story telling/screenwriting, casting, location scouting; production services — lighting, sound and camera operation; post production — editing, but also skills around distribution such as through film festival production, on websites and community access television.

Oscar-nominated filmmaker Dan Junge and his wife Erin visit with Joe Evans at the CIFF.

This project will assist WCM and LCCC design an academic curriculum for those wishing to learn more about digital video media arts and how it can be applied to existing jobs, nurture entrepreneurship of those reinventing themselves, create means and ways for communities to tell their stories and apply their learning in “out of school” experience in partnership with local non-profit organizations. WCM plans to partner with at least five downtown projects and produce promos for the events to bring more cultural tourists to downtown Cheyenne.

WLMTV reporter Kati Hime interviews a vendor at the Cheyenne Frontier Days parade for a "Wyoming Greats" episode.

The project also provides a way to integrate art into the community through monthly Downtown Brown Bag series at non-traditional venues – bookstores, banks, law firms, architect offices, etc. – for local business owners and organizations to position themselves as potential purveyors of goods and services or as locations to the film and digital media industry or for artists wanting to learn about entrepreneurship and the business of art.